Home > Settling In > Staying Safe in Your New Country

Staying Safe in Your New Country

By: Tracy Whitelaw - Updated: 7 Jan 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Safety Abroad Safety When Emigrating

No matter what country in the world you live in you’re always at risk of a negative experience or being the victim of crime at some point. If you’re lucky, it will be something you will never have to experience anywhere in the world. As a new migrant however, the unfamiliarity with your surroundings and local customs may put you more at risk.

Always Know Where You Are and Where You’re Going

As basic as it sounds, it is vitally important in a new country to always know where you’re going and where you are. If it is possible, let someone close to you know where you are going, even if this means leaving details of travel plans and places where you may be stopping for the night. It is very normal when you first arrive in a new country to travel around for some time. Keep an itinerary of exactly where you’re going and give one to friends in the UK. This means they will always know where you are and can get in touch if they need to. It will give them peace of mind, but will also keep you on schedule with your own plans. If you’re travelling a lot by car, always keep a safety kit in the car for emergencies. Have a first aid kit, bottles of water, a blanket, a mobile phone and if you can afford it invest in a satellite navigation system. This way, if you do get lost, you will always be able to find out where you are. Also if you have an accident or breakdown, help will be able to locate you quickly. Always remember to remove your sat nav from the car if you can. It’s a welcome sign to thieves if you leave it in there.

If you have a rental car, it can often be a target for criminals. Dependent on where you are, this may be a common problem. Just remember never to stop for anyone unless it is a police car and don’t get out of your car unless it is life or death. If you have an accident, deal with it as you would in the UK. Always obtain the other drivers details and wait for help or the police if necessary. Getting to know the local road laws will ensure you’re staying safe on the road as much as possible. If you don’t feel confident, get some extra lessons, or alternatively read some of the local Highway Code.

Local Customs and Laws

One of the most important things you can do when arriving in a new country is familiarise yourself with the emergency number. Your new country will have its own equivalent of 999 and you should learn this as soon as you arrive, on the off chance that you may need it. Also make sure that any family members with you know the number. It is often a good idea to locate your local police station and to get their number and save it to your phone or on a piece of paper near your house phone. Often, contacting the local police office can be used instead of the emergency number. Many countries will have various choices of emergency services and you should research which is best suited to you and your location. Get to know your new neighbours, explain to them you’re new to the area and local laws. Often, having neighbours who will keep their eyes and ears open for you is as good as expensive home security. Obviously, if you can afford this however you should get it.

Anything that will give you peace of mind is a good investment. Ultimately following the same rules as you do in the UK will be of most benefit to you.

Safety First in Your New Home

Always remember that moving to a new country will take a great deal of adapting on both a personal and social level. Learning as much as you can about your local area and any crime that occurs there will enable you to best equip yourself with the right tools to stay safe. Many countries or areas within them may have a better standard of life than what you were used to in the UK. After all, that is why you’ve made the move in the first place so just remember to enjoy your new life. Finding out the address and number of the embassy in your new country is always a good idea too, in case you need them in the future.

As long as you follow some basic principles of safety, you’ll have a happy and contented start to your new life abroad.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
although reside in SA with British passports and receive portion of the British pension if we return to the UK would it be automatic to get the full British pension
N/A - 7-Jan-17 @ 11:58 AM
My wife and i after many years in SA now retired wish to return to UK we both have British Passports (although my wife was born in SA)I applied and receive a portion of the British pension, as does my wife.what conditions we have to fulfill to stay in the the UK (if any) and as retired couple, is there a max amount of Rands that people can bring into the UK and still get the full pension at todays amount . Thanks Ron Goulson
Ron - 31-Dec-16 @ 3:02 PM
Jan - Your Question:
My husband and I want to move (retiring) back to UK after 30 years in USA. My husband and 2 children are UK citizens and hold a UK passport. I have a USA passport only. Although I was born in the USA I moved to UK as a young girl, lived there for 35 years and have a NH #. Before we begin selling our house here in USA and buying one in the UK I would like to know if there might be anything we have to consider. Do I have to apply for UK citizenship even though my husband and children are all British and I had lived in UK for half my life?

Our Response:
You don't have to apply for British citizenship, that is up to you. But in order to move back to the UK, your husband would have to sponsor you and you would have to fulfil the financial requirements laid out in the gov.uk link here.
EmigrationExpert - 29-Sep-16 @ 2:12 PM
My husband and I want to move (retiring) back to UK after 30 years in USA.My husband and 2 children are UK citizens and hold a UK passport.I have a USA passport only.Although I was born in the USA I moved to UK as a young girl, lived there for 35 years and have a NH #.Before we begin selling our house here in USA and buying one in the UK I would like to know if there might be anything we have to consider.Do I have to apply for UK citizenship even though my husband and children are all British and I had lived in UK for half my life?
Jan - 28-Sep-16 @ 7:30 PM
@indu - You will need to apply and rack up a total of 67 points to qualify under the country's immigration points system. The pre-requisites include at least one year full-time experience in the last ten years in a management or professional or highly skilled occupation and proof of readily transferable funds which must be your own. You can learn more from the Government of Canada website link here. I hope this helps.
EmigrationExpert - 11-Nov-14 @ 1:50 PM
I WANT TO ASK THAT AFTER +2 HOW I CAN GO TO CANADA ON STUDY BASES IN MEDICAL STREAM . WHAT ARE THE FORMALITIES THAT ARE TO BE DONE . WHAT AMOUNT OF MONEY IS REQUIRED
indu - 11-Nov-14 @ 3:15 AM
@Mel - I've heard the test can take up to six months to process. You may well know that from January 1, 2014, an amended version of the test based means entitlement to JSA(IB) cannot begin until there has been a three month period of continuous residence. The reason was to put off rogue EU benefit claimants. However, it has had other impacts on people outside the EU and it has made it difficult for UK citizens returning from abroad to claim also. Have a word with the benefits office, as he may be entitled to some emergency help.
SarahH - 10-Nov-14 @ 11:45 AM
my son born.7.3.67.in leigh lancs..white English.parent both white English.ect.son left Englandabout 2001...lived in America for fourteen years. has britsh passport and YA No...came back 14 weeks ago...1.8.2014..still waiting to claim any benefits..been told waiting for results of residency test.how long does this take has both me and his mother are in a fix and getting into more debt keeping him .
mel - 8-Nov-14 @ 12:04 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Latest Comments
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the EmigrationExpert website. Please read our Disclaimer.